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» No More Genres from NoahBrier.com
After a totally insane weekend at Electric Picnic, I am back and ready to write again. I've got three entries in my head at the moment, so hopefully that means there will be a bit more real substance around here and a bit less randomness. Just so peopl... [Read More]

Comments

You're right, not much news but an interesting post regardless.

About the community building and the speaking direct to your customers: the downside of this development is of course that more and more parts of our lives are becoming influenced by commerce. And the blurring of all these lines makes it a heck of a lot harder to tell when someone's trying to sell us stuff.

So these are the things that are going on, but I wonder if we should be 100% happy about it...

Russell, as the media owner you presented to, thanks again. Witty, challenging and informative. Your 'always in beta' bit it spot on: as a media owner we need to learn from our mistakes, listen to our audience and our advertisers and constantly adapt.
You left us all looking and thinking about our work in a different way and I can't think of a better compliment. Thanks again.

a few views from a member of your audience...
aside from the brilliant delivery I found it very helpful to have a crystalisation of the thoughts that are occupying lots of minds. Things you mentioned that i've ruminated on since are:
the thought that in the clamour for engagement we need to remember that most of us only want to enagage with just a few brands. what does this mean for the communications from the endless brands that we spend shedloads on but don't really want to be a part of our lives?
and the blurring of editorial and commercial lines. it's very easy for us to get over pre-occupied with the sanctity of commercial free journalism and programming but how many people who consume it really care ? and is there any such thing in the first place in a world where PR and product placement agencies are relentlessly working to influence those who produce what we read watch and listen to? love to know if there's any research into this.and it would be very interesting to start engaging journalist colleagues in this debate

Great post -- thanks for bringing all this stuff together in one place.

And the zefrank video is fantastic.

Thanks for that Russell - as always your wise words help gel the half formed thoughts that rattle around my brain. I like this thinking compared to the 'Big Idea' mantra being constantly churned out by the traditional agencies like BBH (last weeks campaign) - 'we have the ideas around here and we tell you what to think and do, so there' (not a direct quote) - just the same joke told over and over in a slightly different way. They're not in Beta, they're Alpha and they want everyone to know it.

Thanks for that Russell - as always your wise words help gel the half formed thoughts that rattle around my brain. I like this thinking compared to the 'Big Idea' mantra being constantly churned out by the traditional agencies like BBH (last weeks campaign) - 'we have the ideas around here and we tell you what to think and do, so there' (not a direct quote) - just the same joke told over and over in a slightly different way. They're not in Beta, they're Alpha and they want everyone to know it.

can i have an always in beta badge?

We were talking to someone the other day about brands that are genuinely creative and imaginitive online - and strangely Amazon came up (again) as being someone who really lives the notion of perpetual beta. At least they do in the US.

As my colleague Tom neatly put it, they make lots of small bets at once and aren't afraid to lose a couple. And it's true. It's the willingness to make a couple of small (calculated risk) mistakes that really sorts out the people who just talk about this stuff and acually do it. Most brands (and agencies) find it hard to buy (and sell) potential failures...

Any idea of where I can get ahold of that board you're using in the first image? A friend here in Barcelona has a restaurant and I think he could make good use of one of those boards to put up the menu. Thanks.

"Always on beta" could be a good definition for a life-attitude too.

The ability, disposability, or excitement to accept risk.

Could brands changes be just a reflection of people changes?

Thanks for that. London-wise, you and Mark Earls are indeed the Bee's Knees.

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